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Each Spring I open my private collection of trees to the public for a free conference which draws hundreds of attendees from across America. The lectures are focused around soil health and how to fix soil, in addition to tree cultivation, and growing nutrient dense food. I invite professionals recognized globally for being the experts on the topic of soil ecology and molecular biology of soil health. 30 years ago when I started the site had terrible soil that was saline, sodic and alkaline clay that's 12 feet deep, the vicious triad of horrible soil. The pH measured as high as 9.2 with a low of 8.5 in the best areas. I was told by my soil science professor in college that it was impossible to fix this type of soil, however today I have one of the highest active carbon levels measured by the USDA NRCS in the United States and I've never added compost, worm castings or the other stuff used to try and build soil. Hundreds of tree species now thriving on the site are labeled for the event, and the grounds have a nursery with over 100,000 trees in container cultivation for our retail Trees That Please Nursery in Los Lunas NM. If you want to attend one of these spring garden tours, and learn how to use bio-mimicry of molecular biology to fix soil fast, keep an eye on our nursery web site for the event datewww.treesthatplease.org






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