Skip to main content

Growing Pecan Orchards in Southeastern Arizona

Here's good news from our West Coast Distributor John Miller of Spec International. 

He sent me this report with photos yesterday, September 14, 2015. 
The farm is located near the New Mexico Arizona State line South of Interstate 10 in the Chihuahuan Desert.  The trees are irrigated with above ground spray heads with water coming from deep irrigation wells.  Soils are typical Southwestern desert dirt with high pH, high salinity and poor structure after its been disturbed.  As a result crops including  tree crops often show signs of salt burn, iron uptake problems (chlorosis) and zinc uptake  problems on pecan trees.  This particular grower is putting in over a thousand acres of new trees each year with some of the acreage treated with our TerraPro and Protein Crumblies products.  I'm glad he's left some acreage untreated as it gives us the opportunity to compare.  They are also being supplemented nutritionally with a foliar feed using an AgGrand 4-3-3 product which Soil Secrets collaborates with as both company's are very complementary to each other.  Here are some photos showing treated versus non treated, so you can draw your own conclusion.
Leaves from non treated trees

  

Leaves off of trees treated with Soil Secrets and AgGrand



Trees on the left have been treated while those on the right have not.





Looking into the treated field, showing vigorous growth on trees treated May of 2015 with TerraPro, Soil Secrets Bio-Identical Supramolecular Humic Molecule product.


Looking into the field of non treated Pecan trees



Typical new growth with vigorous foliage of a TerraPro treated Pecan.  Trees were treated 4 months earlier at the beginning of the growing season. 

The changes seen on this pecan orchard are consistent with our results seen in California Almond and Pistachio tree orchards where TerraPro's aromatic chemistry corrected the health of the soil, opened up the structure making the soil more porous to oxygen and water, which improves the availability of water and nutrients, while decreasing the damage caused by salinity.   We've done compaction measurements that quantifies these changes showing the compaction of the soil droping form a psi of 300 down to 50 - 75 psi down to a depth of 3 feet. If our penetrometer can probe the soil to a depth of 3 feet with only 50 to 75 pounds of pressure than water and oxygen can easily get into the soil, which changes everything and puts that soil on the journey to better soil health.    Getting the irrigation water to penetrate deeper will help to reduce your irrigation frequency needs and improve the crops ability to get mineral nutrition up into the plant.  In addition to needing less irrigation water, healthy soils also need less fertilizer inputs and in this case the farmer can skip the typical sulfuric acid treatment that's commonly used in Arizona and New Mexico's pecan industry in the attempt to open up the soil and remediate the harmful effects of salt.  TerraPro can do this much more effectively while also improving the health of the soils terrestrial biosphere.  


Michael Meléndrez
Managing Member of Soil Secrets LLC
 
www.soilsecrets.com

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Understanding the Importance of Cation Exchange Capacity

I was recently asked to provide a simplified explanation on the importance of Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) values. My Response:  CEC is the ability of a soil to hold onto plant nutrients.   The finer the particle size the higher CEC value, generally speaking. For example sand particles are course and visible to the naked eye, where as clay particles are fine and are not visible to the naked eye. So clay will have a higher CEC value than sand. It is obvious to most of us that sand cannot hold onto water or nutrients as well as a soil with a finer texture. Therefore, soils rich in Clay and Loam size particles are universally recognized as being better for farming - CEC explains this.  The numerical value for CEC represents how much nutrition can be held by a given amount of soil. For example one pound of a clay loam soil with a CEC value of 20 will hold 4 times as many nutrients as a sandy soil with a CEC value of 5. 20/4 = 5 .  It's all about math, for example Nitrogen in

Food Nutrient Density and Why our BIOpack is so important

Can you  tell the difference?  The first image shows a field that was not sprayed with your Consortium Soil Probiotic called BIOpack.  The second image field was sprayed.  Look at the difference in color and the overall biomass increase   the treated field.    BIOpack is ATCC Certified (American Type Culture Collection) and  USDA  Biobased Certified.  All 20 species included in the BIOpack are exact species that will perform a known Mode of Action which will provide a specific benefit to the crop you are growing.   For example if your lawn, trees, or crop are not getting enough iron pulled out of the soil to satisfy the needs of the crop or plant, than BIOpack can fix that problem by provided a microbe for that particular nutrient.   Bottomline is that BIOpack will improve the Nutrient Density of any crop you grow as it improves the solutioning of the mineral element in the soil from a normally not water soluble into a water solution so the plant can drink it.   This is important

RESEARCH BY SOIL SECRETS

Michael Melendrez August 11 at 6:55 AM ·  There's a huge interest in using CBD oil/extracts and infused products containing CBD as medicine. Soil Secrets with the cooperation of a professional medical cannabis grower did a grow out experiment with spent/used soil compared to brand new Fox Farm Forest Floor soil. We cleaned the used soil using our Soil Secrets trommel screen and the treated the used soil with molecular biology made by Soil Secrets. Most growers throw away soil after one use so wanted to see if the used soil could be made good and repurposed for a second or third use. The image provided is from the starvation group where no fertilizer input had been provided to either the SS treated spent soil or the brand new Fox Farm soil. Both groups were treated with a Mycorrhizal product and bacteria. The Fox Farm was treated with the mycorrhizal product called Great White used per label instructions. Great White also contains a bacteria blend