Skip to main content

Does the vineyard’s dirt really affect the taste of what’s in your glass?




This article is a good start to explaining a bigger problem, which agriculture growing food containing empty calories. There have been many studies over the years showing that the food we eat today contains dramatically lower levels of mineral and vitamin nutrition, when compared to what we were eating in the early to mid 1900s. While in college almost 40 years ago I recall while taking a class in Integrated Nutrition (which is bio chemistry) reading a study that showed the nutrient levels of an orange at that time contained 1/5 the vitamin C, Calcium and other nutrient values that an orange in the 1950s  contained. Yes, you would need to eat 5 oranges in 1978 to match a single orange my grandparents would eat, so it begs the question of what the nutrient levels are today.     Soils of agriculture are certainly far worse in 2016 than they were in 1978!  And we wonder why we are getting fat, as we eat foods of empty calories trying to get enough vitamin and mineral value from lousy food! 
So what's the difference? Are soils lower in minerals or is something inhibiting the nutrient uptake of the indigenous minerals of our farm soil.  Maybe it's both, but my gut feeling is that with the use of high yield acidified fertilizers, soil acidifiers, increasing salinity, herbicides like RoundUp, and our plows roughing up the soil ecology, the microbiology and the Humic chemistry that Nature uses to extract these minerals from the soil are missing, or at a very low functional level.   Elements of plant and human nutrition, such as phosphorus, zinc, iron, copper, calcium, selenium, etc., require a solutioning and solubilizing process to liberate them in order for a plant to take them up. That's done primarily by bacteria, mycorrhizal fungus, and the supramolecular chemistry of the humic molecules  (incorrectly called humic acids).  Soil Secrets LLC, is a soil ecology company that provides in our BioPack Soil Probiotic the microbes that have that mode of action to solubilize phosphorus, silica, sulfur, zinc, copper and iron from soil.  We also formulate TerraPro, a product with the humic molecules making them bio-identical with supramolecular aromatic characteristics. When these inputs are put back into the equation, the nutrient density of the food will increase, the yield of the crop will increase, the sugar concentration in the plant juices measured as Brix increases, the health of the plant increases and the health of the animal eating that plant will improve. Our goal as a company is to fix the soil of agriculture, grow more nutritious food, sequester atmospheric carbon back into the soil, and make our environment a cleaner better place for everyone concerned.

I've attached a report form a wine grower in Baja Mexico who has applied our TerraPro technology to his vines and measured some of these changes.  The details of this farm report are seen in the chart as original from the engineer running the operation, however I needed to interpolate and extrapolate some information in the text to make the information more meaningful for us.  

From the Desk of Michael M. Melendrez, Director of Soil Secrets LLC



Popular posts from this blog

Understanding the Importance of Cation Exchange Capacity

I was recently asked to provide a simplified explanation on the importance of Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) values. My Response:  CEC is the ability of a soil to hold onto plant nutrients.   The finer the particle size the higher CEC value, generally speaking. For example sand particles are course and visible to the naked eye, where as clay particles are fine and are not visible to the naked eye. So clay will have a higher CEC value than sand. It is obvious to most of us that sand cannot hold onto water or nutrients as well as a soil with a finer texture. Therefore, soils rich in Clay and Loam size particles are universally recognized as being better for farming - CEC explains this.  The numerical value for CEC represents how much nutrition can be held by a given amount of soil. For example one pound of a clay loam soil with a CEC value of 20 will hold 4 times as many nutrients as a sandy soil with a CEC value of 5. 20/4 = 5 .  It's all about math, for example Nitrogen in

Growing Pecan Trees in Western Alkaline Soil

It's common to see nutrient and water inhibition compromise the production of pecans in the arid western states, particularly where the soils are high pH, which can tie up nutrients such as zinc, iron, phosphorus and more. Keeping soils moist is also a problem because the regions were we grow pecan are not wet bottomland soils where pecan is native, but are high and dry desert soils where irrigation is essential. If the irrigation water is high in dissolved solids, the problem is made worse. There are many good things Soil Secrets can offer pecan growers that can overcome these obstacles, by improving the moisture management of the soil, improving nutrient solutioning and availability of both the native minerals as well as the purchased minerals, and improving the porosity of the soil so that water and oxygen can penetrate meters deep without the need to subsoil with machinery. How's this done? By using the power of Nature's own bio-chemical called the Carbon Matrix. Starti

Food Nutrient Density and Why our BIOpack is so important

Can you  tell the difference?  The first image shows a field that was not sprayed with your Consortium Soil Probiotic called BIOpack.  The second image field was sprayed.  Look at the difference in color and the overall biomass increase   the treated field.    BIOpack is ATCC Certified (American Type Culture Collection) and  USDA  Biobased Certified.  All 20 species included in the BIOpack are exact species that will perform a known Mode of Action which will provide a specific benefit to the crop you are growing.   For example if your lawn, trees, or crop are not getting enough iron pulled out of the soil to satisfy the needs of the crop or plant, than BIOpack can fix that problem by provided a microbe for that particular nutrient.   Bottomline is that BIOpack will improve the Nutrient Density of any crop you grow as it improves the solutioning of the mineral element in the soil from a normally not water soluble into a water solution so the plant can drink it.   This is important